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null.gifLOCATIONKEY WORDSANIMALSAWARDSnull.gifDESCRIPTIONSIZECOSTSOPENING DATEnull.gifDESIGNCONSTRUCTIONLOCAL CONDITIONSPLANTSnull.gifFEATURES ANIMALSFEATURES KEEPERSFEATURES VISITORSINTERPRETATIONnull.gifRESEARCHMANAGEMENTCONSERVATIONLOCAL RESOURCESnull.gif
 
 
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Fasanerie Wiesbaden

Nutria Exhibit

Kara Chirgwin, Monika Fiby (authors for ZooLex)
Klaus Schüssler (editor for Fasanerie Wiesbaden)
Published 2017-4-17

 

UP LOCATION:

Wilfried-Ries-Straße 20, 65195 Wiesbaden, Germany
Phone: 0049-6-11 4689307
Fax: 0611 40907720
URL: http://www.fasanerie.net


UP KEY WORDS:

Water Rat, small mammal


UP ANIMALS:

Family:Species:Common Name:Capacity:
RodentMyocastor CoypusNutria, Coypu, River Rat1,1+young


UP DESCRIPTION:

In accordance with the masterplan, the Nutria Exhibit was built in the waterbird area to add another attraction to this part of the park and to profit from the natural water flow. It replaces an older, dilapidated enclosure for this species which was no longer suitable for keeping and presenting the animals. The new enclosure was designed to better fulfil the nutrias’ needs of swimming and digging while also presenting the nutrias in a more natural environment.

The Nutria Exhibit has a small elevated part and a large part on ground level. The elevated part is a small pool with glass windows for underwater viewing. The large part has a land area in the back and a pond in the front. The pumps distribute water into the elevated pool and into the large pond, each through a fountain with the water falling about 50cm. A waterfall connects the small pool with the large pond. The falling water adds oxygen, movement and sound to the water which improves water quality and adds sensations to the visitor experience.

The pond water circulates through a wetland planting bed that is part of the barrier between animals and visitors. A handrail keeps visitors out of the waterplant bed. On the animal side, a plastic sheet prevents the nutria from climbing the wall and the fence on the backside and an electric wire keeps them away from the plastic sheet. The fence is bar grate.

The viewing range for visitors extends the length of the Nutria Exhibit, and therefore allows large groups of people to look at the nutrias at the same time. The visitor path leads around a reed bed, assuring good circulation and alleviating crowds.
 

UP SIZE:

50 m² of the roughly 70 m² total animal space are two ponds - a large one and a small pool for underwater viewing. About 70 m² are used to filter water through the wetland planting and reed beds. About 80 m² are service access, service area for the pumps and access to the animal spaces.

Space allocation in square meters:

useindoorsoutdoors     total exhibit    
accessible     total     accessible     total    
animals7070
visitors4040
others150150
total260260

 

UP COSTS:

Euro 160,000 including 6 % for design.

The total cost was for both mink and nutria exhibits. About half of the cost was for water management: collection, storage, pumps, distribution, pools and recycling through wetland plant basins.
 

UP OPENING DATE:

10 September 2012
 

UP DESIGN:

Beginning: August 2006

  • Landscape Design: Monika Fiby, Sobieskigasse 9/12, 1090 Vienna, Austria
  • Concept Design: Dirk Petzold

UP CONSTRUCTION:

Beginning: October 2011

  • Exhibit Construction: Richtig GmbH, Saarstraße 80 65201 Wiesbaden
  • Water Technology: Gerhardt GmbH, 65205 Wiesbaden

UP LOCAL CONDITIONS:

walter.gif This is a climatic diagram for the closest weather station.

 

UP PLANTS:

Because of the nutrias’ digging activities, no plants are grown inside the exhibit.

Reed beds along two sides of the main enclosure provide a green background and serve as a visual barrier hiding the fence. Another reed bed separates the Nutria Exhibit from the Mink-Ferret Rotation Exhibit, with the visitor path leading around.

A shallow wetland planting bed forms the barrier between visitors and nutria. For establishing the wetland plants, they were covered with a mesh that protected them from being eaten by ducks and geese.

Plants around the Nutria Exhibit are part of the filtration system.The reeds play a crucial role in recycling water and maintaining the water quality. The filtered water passes through the reed beds before re-entering the Nutria Exhibit and provides a backdrop for viewers.

The plant list specifies the Latin names of the plants used for this exhibit.


UP FEATURES DEDICATED TO ANIMALS:

Nutria’s tend to settle themselves on riverbanks. Their aquatic lifestyle of submerging in and out of water is encouraged by a long rocky water edge and exposed rocks in the pond that are accessible to them any time. The rocks serve as resting and eating spots as well as provice sun exposure for basking.

On the land there is plenty of space for digging, burrowing and foraging for food. A sandy clay surface on mesh allows the animals to dig without escaping. Willow branches and dead wood fixed in three concrete capsules are used for decoration, and serve as food and gnawing material for the nutrias.

There is a large shelter for the nutria’s to sleep together or if they prefer to rest alone, a couple of small wooden boxes are provided. They also dig their own tunnels to retreat on hot days.
 

UP FEATURES DEDICATED TO KEEPERS:

Animal keepers and maintenance staff have access to the service area behind the exhibit. The large sleeping box can be opened from here. From here, keepers can enter the land section of the Nutria Exhibit for husbandry.

The water treatment system saves staff time and effort.
 

UP FEATURES DEDICATED TO VISITORS:

There is no visual barrier along the viewing side of the Nutria Exhibit. This lets visitors stand close to the edge of the water, and enhances the feeling of being close to the nutrias' habitat. The absence of a visual barrier makes it easy for small children and those in strollers and wheelchairs to see in, and it provides good photo opportunities.

Visitors can also peer through the glass wall that contains the elevated pool. Here, viewers can watch the nutria dive when they are fed in this part of the exhibit.

Due to the location and layout of the Nutria Exhibit and surroundings, strollers and wheelchairs can access all parts of the exhibit. The access route is wide enough to cater to large groups and circulates around a reed bed to disperse visitors. Large trees provide plenty of shade for comfort on hot days.
 

UP INTERPRETATION:

Signage is in place to inform visitors about the biology, habitat and social structure of the animals. The exhibit replicates aspects of the natural habitat of the species and therefore allows the visitors an insight into natural behaviours of the nutria.
 

UP MANAGEMENT:

Reed bed water filtration ensures high water quality. Pumping water out of an underground reservoir allows water levels to be maintained during the summer when water levels can be low.
 

UP RESEARCH:


 

UP CONSERVATION:

The ‘wetland ecosystem’ is an environmentally friendly and cost-effective solution for recycling water and maintaining a healthy water quality for the animals. It also saves time and effort from zoo staff.
 

UP LOCAL RESOURCES:

A local construction company was employed in the construction of this exhibit.

over_t.jpg
55K + description73K
Overview
©Fasanerie Wiesbaden, 2014

 
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75K + description110K
Site Plan
©Monika Fiby, 2007

 
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70K110K
Nutria (1)
©Sabine Kobler, 2011

 
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125K + description197K
Exhibit (2)
©Monika Fiby, 2015

 
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66K121K
Filtration through Reeds (3)
©Kara Chirgwin, 2013

 
3_t.jpg
130K195K
Green Backdrop (4)
©Monika Fiby, 2015

 
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76K + description85K
Shallow Water (5)
©Kara Chirgwin, 2013

 
5_t.jpg
117K + description177K
Animal Barriers (6)
©Monika Fiby, 2015

 
6_t.jpg
57K + description91K
Visitor Barrier (7)
©Kara Chirgwin, 2013

 
7_t.jpg
99K115K
Exhibit - Landing Platform (8)
©Kara Chirgwin, 2013

 
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100K + description113K
Long Viewing Front (9)
©Kara Chirgwin, 2013

 
9_t.jpg
47K + description72K
Water Edge (10)
©Kara Chirgwin, 2013

 
10_t.jpg
67K104K
Nutria (11)
©Tammo Zelle, 2013

 
11_t.jpg
105K + description164K
Exhibit (12)
©Monika Fiby, 2015

 
12_t.jpg
73K + description132K
Water fountains (13)
©Kara Chirgwin, 2013

 
13_t.jpg
50K + description79K
Shelters (14)
©Kara Chirgwin, 2013

 
14_t.jpg
62K96K
Nutria (15)
©Tammo Zelle, 2013

 
15_t.jpg
82K144K
Staff Access (16)
©Kara Chirgwin, 2013

 
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57K90K
Nutria (17)
©Kara Chirgwin, 2013

 
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74K + description117K
Nutria Sleeping Box (18)
©Monika Fiby, 2012

 
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69K107K
Nutria Sleeping Box (19)
©Monika Fiby, 2012

 
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99K109K
Rock Islands (20)
©Kara Chirgwin, 2013

 
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92K100K
Nutria (21)
©Kara Chirgwin, 2013

 
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74K113K
Nutria Exhibit (22)
©Monika Fiby, 2013

 
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146K223K
Nutria Exhibit (23)
©Monika Fiby, 2015

 
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19K31K
Section Drawing (24)
©Monika Fiby, 2011

 

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You are visitor number 2915 to this exhibit presentation.


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